Measurement in Family Studies

  • Walter R. Schumm
  • Karla K. Hemesath

Abstract

Measurement is the process of linking theoretical ideasconcepts—to empirical indicators—variables (Miller, 1986, p. 49). More specifically, it has been defined as “the assignment of numbers to objects or events according to rules” (Stevens, 1951, p. 22) or “the process of assigning numerals to units of analysis in order to represent conceptual properties” (Singleton, Straits, & Straits, 1988, p. 124). We believe that the traditional goal of measurement has been to allow us to operationally define concepts as variables in ways that permit the application of mathematical operations among the created variables. Mathematics as a powerful language allows us to assess variable interrelationships in creative ways. However, important information may be lost in the translation, a concern that underlies the skepticism regarding the validity of much quantitative research and the use of multivariate analyses for understanding families (Miller, 1986).

Keywords

Family Therapy Marital Satisfaction Marital Conflict Marital Quality Marital Adjustment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter R. Schumm
    • 1
  • Karla K. Hemesath
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Family Studies and Human ServicesCollege of Human Ecology, Kansas State UniversityManhattanUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family and Community MedicineCollege of Medicine at RockfordRockfordUSA

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