Wife Battering

  • Gayla Margolin
  • Linda Gorin Sibner
  • Lisa Gleberman

Abstract

Of all forms of family violence, wife battering ranks second, following child abuse, in terms of the attention it now receives in public, professional, and scientific communities. This attention has been painstakingly slow to develop. It has come about only through the untiring efforts of concerned individuals, primarily feminists, who were on the front lines of providing direct services to battered women. Efforts to make known the enormity and severity of this problem have borne the following results: the number of shelters in the United States has grown from two in 1974, to 200 in 1978, to an estimated 780 today (Bowker & Maurer, 1985). On February 2, 1985, the House of Representatives passed the Family Violence Prevention and Services Amendment, which appropriated $65 million over a 3-year period to assist states in preventing violence within families and in the provision of services for victims. This bill is a condensed version of a bill authored by Representative Mikulski to provide federal funding to shelters for battered women, which was unsuccessfully introduced into the House during each Congressional session since 1978 (Melling, 1984). At the time of this writing, the bill had been reduced in scope to $6 million in the first year, but was still alive and awaiting a joint vote in the House and Senate.

Keywords

Domestic Violence Physical Aggression Violent Behavior Family Violence Battered Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gayla Margolin
    • 1
  • Linda Gorin Sibner
    • 1
  • Lisa Gleberman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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