A Taxonomy and Critique of Measurements Used in the Study of Creativity

  • Dennis Hocevar
  • Patricia Bachelor
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Creativity measurement itself has been a creative endeavor for both researchers and practitioners. When viewed as a group, the most salient characteristic of creativity measurements is their diversity. The initial purpose of this review is to integrate creativity measurements into a meaningful taxonomy and to illustrate the diversity of the available measurements by citing key examples of the many and varied ways in which creativity has been operationalized. It also is hoped that the numerous examples will give researchers a concise but thorough picture of the many options available when a measure of creativity is needed. The second goal of this review is to use the taxonomy as a framework for discussing the creativity construct in terms of several psychometric characteristics—namely, reliability, discriminant validity, and nomological validity. The third goal is to describe an analytic framework in which measurement issues can be better addressed.

Keywords

Confirmatory Factor Analysis Discriminant Validity Educational Psychology Verbal Fluency Creative Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Hocevar
    • 1
  • Patricia Bachelor
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State University at Long BeachLong BeachUSA

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