Cognition and Writing

The Idea Generation Process
  • John A. O’Looney
  • Shawn M. Glynn
  • Bruce K. Britton
  • Linda F. Mattocks
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The interest in ideas and where they come from is an old one, dating back at least to pre-Socratic philosophers and continuing to the present-day theories of creative thinking. The question of where ideas come from has been answered in a variety of ways: ideas can come from the gods, from the imagination, from a mind trained in reasoning, from a haphazard association of memories, from stimulating images, from a subconscious bank of archetypes, from memories transformed by mental schemata, and from attempts to solve problems.

Keywords

Idea Generation Processing Capacity Memory Search Writing Process Topic Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. O’Looney
    • 1
  • Shawn M. Glynn
    • 2
  • Bruce K. Britton
    • 3
  • Linda F. Mattocks
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Language EducationUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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