Pediatric Brain Injury

Mechanisms and Amelioration
  • Thomas J. Boll
  • Lisa D. Stanford
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is not to provide a comprehensive review of the literature in the area of pediatric brain injury in neuropsychology. This has been accomplished multiple times, most recently by Ryan, LaMarche, Barth, and Boll (1995). Reviews of specific neurobehavioral recovery issues cited individually in this chapter are also available in reasonably recent form (Levin, Grafman & Eisenberg, 1987). The purpose of this chapter is to engage in a series of discussions about the issues that influence the outcome of pediatric brain injury, including those issues or mechanisms that predate the injury itself. Such mechanisms include the premorbid psychological characteristics of the patient (not just the injury the brain sustains, but the brain that sustains the injury) as well as the epidemiologic mechanisms that contribute to the nature of the injury and the specific characteristics of the individuals who sustain that injury. Amelioration of the injury, which has in many reviews been focused largely on rehabilitative techniques of a formal nature, are discussed in the broader context of psychological interventions, educational interventions, and family-based activities. One of the purposes of this chapter will be to enhance understanding of the importance of the individual who has the accident, and the context in which that individual lives, and will continue to live. The chapter begins with a discussion of the physiological, epidemiological, and psychological mechanisms that characterize a brain injury, and/or characterize the patient who suffers the brain injury. Discussion then proceeds to multifactorial influences on outcome, including those that make outcome in certain instances so perplexing when to initial glance, “dose and response” seems hopelessly out of proportion. The emphasis of the final portion on school and family once again suggests the unique role in children’s lives of those institutions, and the individuals who come into contact with children who have had a head injury, as well as the children who come into contact with the children who have had a head injury. Because considerable data have already been amassed on specific tests, treatment technologies, complicating factors such as bleeding and seizures, and developmental influences, this chapter can enjoy the luxury of going somewhat further afield in discussing those day-to-day and somewhat more mundane issues that cross the clinician’s desk, and confront the treating doctor, be it psychologist, psychiatrist, neurologist, or other health professional.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Injury Head Injury School Personnel Severe Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Boll
    • 1
  • Lisa D. Stanford
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and PsychologyCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA

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