Models of Inference in Evaluating Brain-Behavior Relationships in Children

  • Eileen B. Fennell
  • Russell M. Bauer
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Neuropsychologists generally measure behavior as a means for making inferences about brain function. Regardless of whether such measurement takes place in the clinic or the laboratory, the basic process is the same: Behavioral and cognitive performances that are readily observable “stand in,” as it were, for the less observable “brain states” they are thought to reflect. Once measurement is completed, the quantitative and qualitative relationships among such performances are assembled according to certain rules in order to make probabilistic statements about brain function. The rules that are applied in the given case depend on the inferential model one uses in relating behavioral performance to brain function. This basic process characterizes all of neuropsychology, transcends theoretical persuasion or tests employed, and, in fact, is a fundamental aspect of the clinical-inferential method in general.

Keywords

Neuropsychological Test Neuropsychological Assessment Brain Pathology Test Finding Strong Inference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eileen B. Fennell
    • 1
  • Russell M. Bauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Health PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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