Concepts of Ganglioside Metabolism

  • U. Hinrichs
  • S. Sonderfeld
  • G. Schwarzmann
  • E. Conzelmann
  • K. Sandhoff
Part of the FIDIA Research Series book series (FIDIA, volume 6)

Abstract

Gangliosides (Fig. 1),although characteristic components of all mammalian plasma membranes, are highly abundant in nervous tissues only. They are arranged asymmetrically in the outer leaflet of cellular membranes, their carbohydrate chains facing the extracellular space. Little is known about their function and about the regulation of their metabolism, the elucidation of which might be helpful in understanding the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the clinical symptoms of ganglioside storage diseases.

Keywords

Skin Fibroblast Total Lipid Extract Cerebellar Cell Lysosomal Fraction Mammalian Plasma Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Hinrichs
    • 1
  • S. Sonderfeld
    • 1
  • G. Schwarzmann
    • 1
  • E. Conzelmann
    • 1
  • K. Sandhoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut f. Organische Chemie und BiochemieUniversität Bonn53 BonnFederal Republic of Germany

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