HPLC-Mass Spectrometry of Isoflavonoids in Soy and the American Groundnut, Apios Americana

  • S. Barnes
  • C-C. Wang
  • M. Kirk
  • M. Smith-Johnson
  • L. Coward
  • N. C. Barnes
  • G. Vance
  • B. Boersma
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 505)

Abstract

There is an ever growing interest in the study of the polyphenols. Their importance in the prevention of chronic disease is gradually being unfolded. Examples range from those such as the flavonoid quercitin and the stilbene resveratrol in red wine (Das et al., 1999) to the isoflavonoids daidzein, genistein and glycitein in soy (Barnes, 1998).

Keywords

Stilbene Resveratrol Isoflavonoids Daidzein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Barnes
    • 1
    • 2
  • C-C. Wang
    • 2
  • M. Kirk
    • 2
  • M. Smith-Johnson
    • 1
  • L. Coward
    • 2
  • N. C. Barnes
    • 3
  • G. Vance
    • 4
  • B. Boersma
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology & ToxicologyUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Comprehensive Cancer Center Mass Spectrometry Shared FacilityUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.The Resource Learning CenterShades Valley High SchoolBirminghamUSA
  4. 4.Vestavia High SchoolVestaviaUSA

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