Endotoxin pp 101-119 | Cite as

Structure-Activity Relationship of Chemically Synthesized Nonreducing Parts of Lipid a Analogs

  • J. Y. Homma
  • M. Matsuura
  • Y. Kumazawa
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 256)

Abstract

One of the main aims of endotoxin researchers for almost half a century to date has been to discover the intrinsic chemical nature of endotoxin from complicated chemical complexes of enormous molecular weight. The lipopolysaccharide-protein complex which proved to exhibit all the activities of endotoxin was first isolated from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria. After precise immunochemical studies on endotoxin by several pioneers, the portion called free lipid A was claimed by Westphal and Lüderitz to be responsible for the endotoxin activities. This was in the early 1950’s. Much experimental data was collected to prove that free lipid A is the sole structure responsible for endotoxicity (5).

Keywords

Synthetic Compound Mitogenic Activity Backbone Structure Adjuvant Activity Natural Lipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Y. Homma
    • 1
  • M. Matsuura
    • 1
  • Y. Kumazawa
    • 2
  1. 1.The Kitasato InstituteKitasato UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.School of Pharmaceutical SciencesKitasato UniversityTokyoJapan

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