Endotoxin pp 71-79 | Cite as

Immunochemistry of Lipid A

  • N. Kasai
  • S. Arata
  • J. Mashimo
  • T. Hirayama
  • M. Ueno
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 256)

Abstract

We previously suggested (1, 2, 8–10) that lipid A epitopes are composed of the backbone and acyl groups of the lipid A molecule, and that lipid A has specific and common or cross-reactive epitopes, in which the specificities are derived from the chemical and conformational structures of the backbone and/or acyl groups. In these studies, the in vitro antigenic reactivity of a number of chemically synthesized lipid A analogs with free lipid A preparations from many strains including E. coli, Salmonella minnesota, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Chromobacterium violaceum, Plesiamonas shigelloides and Pseudomonas diminuta was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ELISA inhibition test with monoclonal and conventional antibodies against the free lipid A from S. minnesota R595. During these studies, we found that the development of monoclonal antibodies against lipid A having different backbone and/or hydrophobic structures, and the evaluation of antibody-specificity by various assay systems was important to confirm our hypothesis concerninglipid A epitopes.In the presentstudy, therefore, we examined the in vitro antigenic reactivity of synthetic lipid A analogs and bacterial lipid A with monoclonal and conventional antibodies against the lipid A of E. coli F515, E. coli J5 and P. diminuta JCM 2788, as well as S. minnesota R595 by the ELISA, ELISA inhibition test, and the immunodot assay.

Keywords

Test Antigen Free Lipid Antigenic Reactivity Chromobacterium Violaceum Synthetic Lipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Kasai
    • 1
  • S. Arata
    • 1
  • J. Mashimo
    • 1
  • T. Hirayama
    • 1
  • M. Ueno
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbial Chemistry, School of Parmaceutical SciencesShowa UniversityTokyo 142Japan

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