Endotoxin pp 369-374 | Cite as

Modulation of Interleukin 1 Production by Endotoxin, Pertussis Toxin, and Indomethacin

  • T. W. Klein
  • C. A. Newton
  • F. R. Vogel
  • H. Friedman
  • M. Lucas
  • A. Rodloff
  • H. Hahn
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 256)

Abstract

Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough and little is known concerning the pathophysiology of the disease process. This is partially due to the fact that there is no suitable animal model for studying whooping cough. This microorganism produces a variety of toxins and biologically active extracellular products (10) including endotoxin (LPS) and the ADP-ribosylating toxin called pertussis toxin. B. pertussis endotoxin is typical in that it is composed of lipid A, a KDO residue and a polysaccharide portion (1, 4). This endotoxin has many of the biological properties of endotoxins from the family Enterobacteriacea including lethal toxicity, B lymphocyte mitogenicity, induction of the Shwartzman phenomenon, and pyrogenicity. In addition, crude LPS and the isolated polysaccharide group have been demonstrated to induce the formation of interleukin 1 in human monocyte preparations (1, 4). However, purified lipid A was unable to induce IL 1 in monocytes, but was pyrogenic (1).

Keywords

Pertussis Toxin Peritoneal Cell Bordetella Pertussis Whooping Cough BDF1 Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. W. Klein
    • 1
  • C. A. Newton
    • 1
  • F. R. Vogel
    • 1
  • H. Friedman
    • 1
  • M. Lucas
    • 2
  • A. Rodloff
    • 2
  • H. Hahn
    • 2
  1. 1.College of MedicineUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Medical MicrobiologyFree University of BerlinBerlinGermany

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