Transaction Cost Economics of Postage Payment and Mailer-Post Interface

  • L. A. Pintsov
  • S. Joshi
  • T. Biasi
Part of the Topics in Regulatory Economics and Policy Series book series (TREP, volume 31)

Abstract

In 1840, the first prepayment system for letters was established in England with a uniform rate of one penny for all domestic letters of a certain weight regardless of the distance involved. The world’s first postage stamp, the “Penny Black” was introduced as a proof of payment. This was the beginning of the universal service and the uniform rate system. Further development of postal communications systems required new approaches to payment. In 1920, Arthur Pitney developed and began production of the first postage meters that considerably improved operational aspects of prepayment system. Due to several limitations of the metering system, it was difficult to adapt it for high volume and high performance mail generation systems. This provided the initial impetus for development of various permit (postage paid impressions) systems. It is important to note that all these developments since 1840 preserved the basic principle of prepayment.

Keywords

Credit Card Smart Card Payment System Accounting Information Transaction Cost Economic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Coase, R. 1937. The Nature of the Firm. Reprinted in The Nature of the Finn, edited by O.E. Williamson and Sidney G. Winter. Oxford University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Pintsov
  • S. Joshi
  • T. Biasi

There are no affiliations available

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