Transaction Costs of Alternative Postage Payment and Evidencing Systems

  • John Haldi
  • John T. Schmidt
Part of the Topics in Regulatory Economics and Policy Series book series (TREP, volume 31)

Abstract

All mail is required to exhibit some form of evidence indicating that the appropriate postage has been paid. Traditional evidencing takes one of three familiar forms: stamps, a preprinted indicia, or franking via a meter imprint.1

Keywords

Transaction Cost Post Office Rate Incentive Institutional Cost Postal Administration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Haldi
  • John T. Schmidt

There are no affiliations available

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