Mail Goes Where the Money is

A Study of Rural Mail Delivery in the United States
  • Marshall Kolin
  • Edward J. Smith
Part of the Topics in Regulatory Economics and Policy Series book series (TREP, volume 31)

Abstract

The household targets preferred by United States mailers are those with high “Permanent Income.”2 High “Permanent Income” implies high past and anticipated expenditures and financial institution activity. Thus, the title of this paper which adds to the literature on United States Rural Mail Delivery pioneered by Cohen, Ferguson, and Xenakis and by Haldi and Merewitz, paraphrases the stated rationale for his choice of location for professional activity by one Willie Sutton. When asked why he robbed banks, he replied, “’cause that’s where the money is.”

Keywords

Delivery Cost Permanent Income Route Length Institutional Cost Delivery Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Bradley, Michael D., and Jeffrey Colvin. 1995. “An Econometric Model of Postal Delivery.” In Commercialization of Postal and Delivery Services: National and International Perspectives, edited by M.A. Crew and P.R. Kleindorfer. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  2. Christensen, Dianne C., Laurits R. Christensen, Charles E. Guy, and Donald J. O’Hara. 1993. “U.S. Postal Service Productivity: Measurement and Performance.” In Regulation and the Nature of Postal and Delivery Services, edited by M.A. Crew and P.R. Kleindorfer. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  3. Cohen, Robert H., William W. Ferguson, and Spyros S. Xenakis. 1993. “Rural Delivery and the Universal Service Obligation: A Quantitative Investigation.” In Regulation and the Nature of Postal and Delivery Services, edited by M.A. Crew and P.R. Kleindorfer. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  4. Haldi, John, and Leonard Merewitz. 1997. “Cost and Returns from Delivery to Sparsely Settled Rural Areas.” In Managing Change in the Postal and Delivery Industries, edited by M.A. Crew and P.R. Kleindorfer. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Kolin, Marshall, and Edward J. Smith. 1997. “Mail Goes Where the Money Is: An Investigation into Determinants of Delivery Point Mail Volume.” Presented at the Conference on the Evolving Structure of Postal and Delivery Industries in Helsingor, Denmark.Google Scholar
  6. Tolley, George S. Direct Testimony on behalf of the United States Postal Service before the Postal Rate Commission in Docket No. R94–1 and Docket R97–1.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marshall Kolin
  • Edward J. Smith

There are no affiliations available

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