Consideration of Neuropsychological Factors in Interviewing

  • David M. Freed

Abstract

Our world is, first and foremost, a world of other persons. For most individuals, success is based on ability to successfully interact with other individuals, to convey and receive information. The salesman’s ability to assess a potential client, an advertiser’s sensitivity to consumers, a judge’s ability to evaluate an individual’s guilt, a suitor’s ability to determine receptivity, and a psychologist’s ability to infer parental fitness are all examples of the importance of assessment. Assessment is the process by which we acquire information about other individuals.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Clinical Interview Criminal Responsibility Collateral Informant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Freed
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human ServicesOregon State HospitalSalemUSA

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