Psychophysiological Disorders

  • Ellie T. Sturgis

Abstract

The conditions identified as psychophysiological disorders have had an interesting history. It is as if one is involved in a game of hide and seek: now you see them; now you do not. This history is reflective of the changes in the understanding of medical and psychological disorders over the past century. Early in the century, a dualistic model pervaded in which the mind and body were considered separate entities. Any influence of one upon the other was hypothesized as unidirectional. The discipline of health psychology emerged in the late 1970s and included psychologists of varied disciplinary persuasions and methodologies who shared common interests in health and illness (Revenson & Baum, 2000). A non-dualistic understanding of behavior emerged—the biopsychosocial model (Engel, 1977; Schwartz, 1982). This approach viewed health and illness as an integration of physiological, psychological, and social factors with no single system being primary. Each part of the symptom affected and was affected by each other component. Proponents of this model argued that disorders or diseases were not caused by single agents or factors, that is, the reciprocal interaction of varied factors resulted in the manifestation of the symptoms (Revenson & Baum, 2000).

Keywords

Chronic Pain Irritable Bowel Syndrome American Psychiatric Association Bowel Movement Peptic Ulcer Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ellie T. Sturgis
    • 1
  1. 1.Counseling Associates of Southwest VirginiaBlacksburgUSA

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