Knowledge Creation through Systems Development

  • Helen Hasan
Conference paper

Abstract

There is a distinction between the descriptive and design sciences where, according to Simon (1981), “design sciences do not tell how things are but how they ought to be to attain some ends”. Design sciences aim not only to develop knowledge for the design and realisation of artefacts but also to improve the understanding of how to solve the social and organisational problems for which the artefact is designed. IS research draws its significance from the uniqueness of computer-based information and communication tools and their place in shaping recent human, social and organisational history. Advances in the field result from a better understanding of how to develop and use these tools and what impact they have on the way we work, and live. The question posed by Gregor (2002, p. 12) is: what constitutes a contribution to knowledge when research is of this type? Papers describing such research typically contain “no hypotheses, no experimental design and no data analysis” (ibid, p. 13) and so often pose a dilemma for reviewers. This does not necessarily invalidate this type of research and the challenge is to conduct and report it in ways that identify the rigour and contribution of the research making it acceptable to journal editors and reviewers.

Keywords

System Development Knowledge Management Information System Knowledge Creation Participatory Action Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alexander, C., Ishikawa, S., and Silverstein, M., 1977, A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Constructions, Oxford University Press, NY.Google Scholar
  2. Alvai, M. and Leidner, D., 1999, Knowledge Management Systems: Issues, Challenges and Benefits, Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 1 /7.Google Scholar
  3. Baskerville, R., and Wood-Harper, A. T., 1998, Diversity in information systems action research methods, European Journal of Information Systems, 7, 90–107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Blackler, F., 1993, Knowledge and the Theory of Organisations: Organisations as Activity Systems and the Reframing of Management, Journal of Management Studies, 30, 863–884.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Blackler, F., 1993, Knowledge and the Theory of Organisations: Organisations as Activity Systems and the Reframing of Management, Journal of Management Studies, 6, 863–884.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Boland, R. and Tenkasi, R., 1995, Perspective Making and Perspective Taking in Communities of Knowing, Org Science, 4, 350–372CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Boland, R. and Tenkasi, R., 1995, Perspective Making and Perspective Taking in Communities of Knowing, Org Science, 6, 350–372CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Burstein, F., and Gregor, S., 1999, The systems development or engineering approach to research in Information Systems: an action research perspective, Proceedings of ACIS99, Wellington, NZ, 122–134.Google Scholar
  9. Engeström, Y., 1987, Learning by expanding: An activity-theoretical approach to developmental research, Orienta-Konsultit, Helsinki.Google Scholar
  10. Engeström, Y., 2002, Cultural-Historical Activity Theory, notes available at: http://www.helsinkiii/-jengestr/activity Google Scholar
  11. Fowler, A., 2000, The role of AI-based technology in support of the knowledge management value activity cycle, Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 9, 107–128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Gregor, S., 2002, A theory of Theories in Information Systems, in: Information Systems Foundations: Building the Theoretical Basis, S. Gregor and D. Hart, ANU Canberra, pp. 1–20Google Scholar
  13. Hasan, H., 2003, An Activity-based Model of Collective Knowledge, accepted for Proceedings of HICSS36.Google Scholar
  14. Hasan, H. and Crawford K., 2002, Codifying or Enabling: the Challenge of Knowledge Management Systems, Journal of Operation Research.Google Scholar
  15. Kaptelinin, 1996, Computer-Mediated Activity: Functional Organs in Social and Developmental Context, in: Context and Consciousness: Activity Theory and Human-Computer Interactions, Nardy, B., ed., Cambridge, Mass: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  16. Kasanen, E., Lukka, K. and Siitonen, A., 1993, The Constructive Approach in Management Accounting Research, Journal of Management Accounting Research, (Fall), 243–264.Google Scholar
  17. Koskivaara, E., 2002, Design Science Approaches to Information Systems Research, in: Information Systems Foundations: Building the Theoretical Basis, S. Gregor and D. Hart, ANU Canberra, pp. 205–216.Google Scholar
  18. Lyon, K. L., 2000, Using Patterns to Capture Tacit Knowledge and Enhance Knowledge Transfer in Virtual Teams, in: Knowledge Management and Virtual Organisations, Y. Malhotra ed., Idea Group Publishing, Hershey PA.Google Scholar
  19. March, S. T., Smith, G. F., 1995, Design and natural science research on information technology, Decision Support Systems, 15, 251–266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Markus, L. Majchrzak, A. Gasser, L, 2002, A Design Theory for Systems that Support Emergent Knowledge Processes, MIS Quartery, 3, 179–212.Google Scholar
  21. Markus, L. Majchrzak, A. Gasser, L, 2002, A Design Theory for Systems that Support Emergent Knowledge Processes, MIS Quartery, 26, 179–212.Google Scholar
  22. McAdam, R. and McCreedy, S., 1999, A Critical Review of Knowledge Management Models, The Learning Organisation, 6, 91–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. McAdam, R. and McCreedy, S., 1999, A Critical Review of Knowledge Management Models, The Learning Organisation, 3, 91–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. McLure-Wasko, M. and Faraj, S., 2000, “It is what one does”: why people participate and help other in electronic communities of practice, Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 9, 155–173.Google Scholar
  25. Mentzas, G., Apostolou, D., Young, R. and Abecker, A., 2001, Knowledge networking: a holistic solution for leveraging corporate knowledge, Journal of Knowledge Management, 5, 94–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Mentzas, G., Apostolou, D., Young, R. and Abecker, A., 2001, Knowledge networking: a holistic solution for leveraging corporate knowledge, Journal of Knowledge Management, 1, 94–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Miles, M. B. and Huberman, A. M., 1994, Qualitative Data Analysis, Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA. Niiniluoto, I., 2001, Futures studies: science or art?, Futures, 33, 371–377.Google Scholar
  28. Nunamaker, J. F., Chen, M., Purdin, T., 1991, Systems Development in Information Systems Research, Journal of Management Information Systems, 3, 89–106.Google Scholar
  29. Nunamaker, J. F., Chen, M., Purdin, T., 1991, Systems Development in Information Systems Research, Journal of Management Information Systems, 7, 89–106.Google Scholar
  30. Orlikowski, W., 1993, CASE Tools as“ Organisational Change: Investigating Incremental and Radical Changes in Systems Development, MIS Quarterly, 17 /3.Google Scholar
  31. Schultze, U. and Boland, R, 2000, Knowledge management technology and the reproduction of knowledge work practices, Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 9, 193–212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Simon, H., 1981, The sciences of the artificial, The MIT Press, Cambridge MA. The Macquarie Dictionary, 1981, Macquarie University Press, North Ryde, Australia.Google Scholar
  33. Virkkunen, J. and Kuutti, K., 2000, Understanding organisational learning by focusing on “activity systems”, Accounting, Management and Information Technology, 10, 291–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Vygotsky, L.S., 1978, Mind and Society, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  35. Zuboff, S., 1988, In the Age of the Smart Machine,Heinemann Professional, Oxford.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen Hasan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information SystemsUniversity of WollongongWollongongAustralia

Personalised recommendations