Programs and Primers for Childrearing Education: A Critique

  • Alison Clarke-Stewart
Part of the Child Nurturance book series (CHILDNUR, volume 4)

Abstract

If anyone were to inquire of any student of social progress, “What is the newest development in the educational world?” The answer would almost surely be schools for infants and a constructive program of education for parents. (1)

Keywords

Child Development Parent Education Parent Training Parent Program Preschool Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Footnotes

  1. (1).
    28th NSSE Yearbook, 1929, page 7.Google Scholar
  2. (2).
    28th NSSE Yearbook, 1929, page 20.Google Scholar
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    Editorial, The New York Times, November 1, 1925.Google Scholar
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  6. (6).
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alison Clarke-Stewart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EducationUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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