Economic Size of Building Components

  • Rosalie T. Ruegg
  • Harold E. Marshall

Abstract

In this chapter we demonstrate with two case studies how to determine the economic size of a component of a building or facility. The first case shows how to size attic insulation, i.e., how to choose the economically efficient level. NS is the evaluation measure, and sensitivity analysis is the technique for taking into account uncertainty.

Keywords

Cash Flow Replacement Cost Building Component Economic Size Constant Dollar 
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References

  1. U.S. Department of the Army. 1986. Economic Studies for Military Construction Design—Applications. Technical Manual TM 5–802–1. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Army.Google Scholar
  2. Lippiatt, Barbara, and Rosalie Ruegg. 1987. Energy Prices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis. NBSIR 85–3273–2. Gaithersburg, Maryland: National Bureau of Standards.Google Scholar
  3. Petersen, Stephen R. 1981. Economics and Energy Conservation in the Design of New Single-Family Housing. NBSIR 81–2380. Gaithersburg, Maryland: National Bureau of Standards.Google Scholar
  4. Residential/Light Commercial Cost Data. 1987. Kingston, Massachusetts: R. S. Means Company, Inc.Google Scholar
  5. Ruegg, Rosalie T. 1987. Life-Cycle Costing Manual for the Federal Energy Management Program. NBS Handbook 135. Gaithersburg, MD: National Bureau of Standards.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosalie T. Ruegg
  • Harold E. Marshall

There are no affiliations available

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