Life-Cycle Cost (LCC)

  • Rosalie T. Ruegg
  • Harold E. Marshall

Abstract

The LCC method is used to make cost-effective choices for a given building, facility, or system. Emphasis is on cost effectiveness because the LCC method is used to evaluate alternatives which compete primarily on the basis of costs. Thus target performance standards are defined, and only candidates which meet the standards are considered. The LCC associated with each candidate is computed, and the candidate with the lowest LCC is the cost-effective solution. If revenue and other benefits predominate, one of the other evaluation methods, such as net benefits, is usually more appropriate than LCC.1

Keywords

Cost Model Building System HVAC System Detailed Case Study Interdependent System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). 1989. Standard Practice for Measuring Life-Cycle Costs of Building and Building Systems. E 917–89. Philadelphia: ASTM.Google Scholar
  2. Ruegg, Rosalie T. and Stephen R. Petersen. 1987. Comprehensive Guide for Least-Cost Energy Decisions. SP 709. Gaithersburg, MD: National Bureau of Standards.Google Scholar
  3. Ruegg, Rosalie T., Stephen R. Petersen, and Harold E. Marshall. 1980. Recommended Practice for Measuring Life-Cycle Costs of Buildings and Building Systems. NBSIR 80–2040. Gaithersburg, MD: National Bureau of Standards.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosalie T. Ruegg
  • Harold E. Marshall

There are no affiliations available

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