Abstract

In the most general sense, animal psychophysics can be defined as an area of research in which the primary concern is with the behavioral analysis of sensory function. The basic data are the conditioned responses of the awake, intact organism to sensory stimulation. The properties of a sensory system—that is, its qualifications as a detector of environmental energy—are evaluated by reference to these overt behavioral responses.

Keywords

Unconditioned Stimulus Psychometric Function Operant Conditioning Sensory Function Sensory Experiment 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • William C. Stebbins
    • 1
  1. 1.Kresge Hearing Research Institute, and Departments of Otorhinolaryngology and PsychologyUniversity of Michigan Medical SchoolAnn ArborUSA

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