Concluding Comments

  • George A. Sacher
Part of the Advances in experimental medicine and biology book series (AEMB, volume 108)

Abstract

Several contributors to this volume have given implicit or explicit acceptance to the theory that aging is a programmed process. It is understandable that chronobiologists, who have done so much to demonstrate the exquisite genetically determined preprogramming whereby living systems accommodate to the daily, tidal, lunar and annual cycles, should be predisposed to view aging as a process that is similarly under positive genetic control. However, I feel that a word of caution is needed, not in regard to the theory per se—it is not, after all, a question on which one can have a “pro” or “anti” position—but rather in regard to the logical and semantic pitfalls that await the unwary.

Keywords

Annual Plant Program Process Life Expectation History Phenomenon Peromyscus Leucopus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • George A. Sacher
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biological and Medical ResearchArgonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA

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