The Biology of Taurine in Nutrition and Development

  • John A. Sturman
  • Kenneth C. Hayes

Abstract

Taurine, 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid, is a simple sulfur-containing compound, molecular weight 125, which is ubiquitous in nature (Fig. 1). It is known to have been present in living organisms since 1827 (Tiedemann and Gmelin, 1827), and conceivably it existed even before the origin of life (Choughuley and Lemmon, 1966). Taurine is one of the most abundant amino acids present in mammals, but it takes part in few biochemical reactions, and little is known of its function. It is used for conjugation with bile acids in the liver, an observation first reported in 1849 (Strecker, 1849) and confirmed repeatedly (Danielsson, 1963; Haslewood, 1964; Hofmann, 1976; Vessey, 1978).

Keywords

Bile Acid Free Amino Acid Olfactory Bulb Retinal Degeneration Bile Acid Conjugation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Sturman
    • 1
  • Kenneth C. Hayes
    • 2
  1. 1.Developmental Neurochemistry LaboratoryDepartment of Pathological Neurobiology, Institute for Basic Research in Mental RetardationStaten IslandUSA
  2. 2.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA

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