The Relevance of Gibson’s Ecological Approach to Perception for Environment-Behavior Studies

  • Harry Heft
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design book series (AEBD, volume 4)

Abstract

The ecological approach developed by the late James J. Gibson (1966, 1979) has been described as a revolutionary psychology (Heft, 1988a; Mace, 1977; Neisser, 1976, 1990; Reed, 1988, 1996; Reed & Jones, 1979; Turvey, 1977). It is a radical departure from the way perceiving, and knowing more generally, have been traditionally conceptualized in psychology and philosophy. At the heart of Gibson’s ecological approach is an original analysis of the environment, which in turn leads to a novel view of person—environment relations with significant implications for psychology and epistemology. Because of the distinctive nature of these conceptualizations of the environment and person—environment relations, Gibson’s ecological approach has been promoted as having particular significance for environment—behavior (EB) studies and environmental design (Heft, 1981, 1988a; Kaminski, 1989; Krampen, 1991; Landwehr, 1988; Lang, 1987).

Keywords

Ecological Approach Perceptual Theory Stimulus Information Environmental Perception Ecological Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry Heft
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyDenison UniversityGranvilleUSA

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