Studying Culture and History in Exotic Places and at Home

  • Denise L. Lawrence-Zúñiga
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design book series (AEBD, volume 4)

Abstract

Studies of culture and history, although never central to environment—behavior (EB) research, have long enjoyed a place in a field largely influenced by environmental psychology. Considerations of culture, perhaps the broadest of all frameworks for examining human behavior, have been a significant area of continuous investigation, however, while historical approaches have traditionally been only a minor aspect of the work. This chapter critically examines a selected sample of cultural and historical studies from the perspective of an anthropologist working in the EB field and outlines major contributions to the study of culture—environment relations.

Keywords

Comparative Perspective Cultural Theory Personal Space Cultural Meaning Cultural Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise L. Lawrence-Zúñiga
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchitectureCalifornia State Polytechnic UniversityPomonaUSA

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