Immunobiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Pancreas Graft Rejection

  • Rainer W. G. Gruessner

Abstract

The immunologic basis of graft rejection was established by Medawar1,2 in the 1940s and 1950s. Since then, remarkable progress has been made in understanding the complexity of the rejection process and developing strategies to abrogate its occurrence. Over the last 20 years, it has become apparent that the immunobiology of pancreas allograft rejection is not different, by and large, from that of other types of solidorgan transplants. Some evidence, however, suggests that the mechanisms of rejection might be slightly different for exocrine vs endocrine pancreatic tissue.

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Graft Loss Rejection Episode Pancreas Transplant Acute Rejection Episode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

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  • Rainer W. G. Gruessner

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