Collector Mechanism II. Non-Thiol Collectors

  • S. Ramachandra Rao
Chapter

Abstract

All non-thiol compounds employed in flotation as collectors (whether in separation of sulfides or nonsulfides), that is, alkyl carboxylates, alkyl sulfates and sulfonates, alkyl amines, and alkyl-substituted amines, etc., are sur-factants with C10 -C18 hydrocarbon chains, whereas thio collectors employed generally have C2 -C6 hydrocarbon chains. This difference in alkyl groups is due to the relative insolubility of longer-chain thio compounds in water and the apparent efficacy of the short-chain tliiol collectors. Xanthates, and thio compound collectors in general, become immobilized at solid/liquid interfaces mainly by the chemisorption mechanism. Some non-thio compounds, such as carboxylates, appear to be capable of becoming immobilized for the purpose of flotation by all three mechanisms mentioned in Chapter 10, that is, (1) chemisorption, (2) specific adsorption in the IHP without charge transfer, and (3) electrostatic adsorption over a network of laterally bonded complex counterions. Others, such as sulfonates and amines, appear to adsorb mainly by the latter two mechanisms. There lias been no sufficiently systematic study carried out to state unequivocally under what conditions the three mechanisms may take place in a particular flotation system, but there exists ample evidence of the individual mechanisms occurring with different surfactant systems.

Keywords

Zeta Potential Lauric Acid Dodecyl Amine Adsorption Density Sodium Laurate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Ramachandra Rao
    • 1
  1. 1.McGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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