TGFα within Compartments of Human Milk

  • Carol L. Wagner
  • John E. Baatz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

Human milk plays a significant role in postnatal gut maturation and may serve as a vehicle for transmitting developmental signals from mother to neonate (Okada et al. 1991; Wagner et al. 1995). Various growth factors, cytokines, and gut peptides have been isolated from human milk, often in quantities that exceed maternal serum levels (Kudlow & Bjorge 1990; Coffey et al. 1992). There exists an interrelated system in which compartmentation of milk components leads to controlled release of nutrients and metabolites to the breastfed infant. Various proteins are sequestered differentially within the compartments of human milk. These proteins become sequentially processed within the gastrointestinal tract (Kudlow & Bjorge 1990). The majority of studies on human milk have focused on the aqueous (defatted) fraction of whole milk rather than the various compartments that include fat. Yet, the fat compartment composed of the milk fat globule with its associated plasma membrane appears to provide a unique delivery system of bioactive substances to the newborn gut (Okada et al. 1991; Wagner et al. 1995; Jensen etal. 1995).

Keywords

Milk Sample Human Milk Aqueous Fraction Breastfed Infant Maternal Serum Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol L. Wagner
    • 1
  • John E. Baatz
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neonatology, Department of PediatricsMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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