International Perspective Global Outlook for Health Information and Communication Technologies

  • Klaus A. Kuhn
Part of the Health Informatics Series book series (HI)

Abstract

In April 2002, the Working Group on Health Information Systems of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA WG 10/HIS) held a Working Conference in Heidelberg, Germany, where international experts discussed the problems, challenges, and solutions currently confronting the development and deployment of healthcare information systems worldwide [1,2]. The perspective outlined in this chapter will comprise an overview of the results elaborated during this conference. While the Heidelberg conference was focusing primarily on the status of health care in highly industrialized nations, an overview of the situation in developing countries will be added as well.

Keywords

Hospital Information System Health Information System Information System Development Healthcare Information System Software Engineering Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

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  • Klaus A. Kuhn

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