The Mission of IT in Health Care: Creating a System That Cares

  • Neal L. Patterson
Part of the Health Informatics Series book series (HI)

Abstract

Public concern about the quality and safety of healthcare delivery reached an unparalleled high in the closing days of the 1990s. The patient safety movement that had been growing slowly all decade exploded in November 1999 when the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences released a compelling and controversial report claiming that between 44, 000 and 98, 000 Americans die each year as a result of preventable medical errors [1]. Implicit in the name of the report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, was the message that we have only one alternative. No matter how much we strive for perfection, it is our nature as human beings to make mistakes. The only way to eradicate inevitable, understandable human errors is to construct a healthcare environment that systematically eliminates threats to our safety.

Keywords

Information Technology Lyme Disease Healthcare Delivery Complex Adaptive System Personal Health Record 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Neal L. Patterson
    • 1
  1. 1.Cerner CorporationKansas CityUSA

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