Epstein-Barr Virus Infection/Infectious Mononucleosis

  • James McSherry

Abstract

First detected in African Burkitt’s lymphoma cells in 19641 the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was identified as the cause of infectious mononucleosis (IM) in 19682 when a laboratory worker developed antibodies to the virus during an episode of IM. Large-scale seroepidemiologic studies subsequently confirmed the role of EBV in IM. It has also been implicated as an etiologic factor in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and oral hairy leukoplakia.

Keywords

Infectious Mononucleosis Slide Test Viral Capsid Antigen Heterophile Antibody Oral Hairy Leukoplakia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • James McSherry

There are no affiliations available

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