Family Medicine pp 1693-1696 | Cite as

Suicide

  • D. Melessa Phillips

Abstract

It is not completely understood what forces a person into an act that most humans try to avoid: the inevitable confrontation with death. Premature self-incurred death remains a paradox to society and the medical profession. Suicide can be the result of a poorly controlled impulse or the meticulously deliberate solution to a stressful life situation. Previous suicide attempts, alcoholism, drug abuse, psychosis, chronic illness, significant loss, unemployment, risk taking, and family or peer precedent of suicide constitute major risk factors. Depression is common but not a prerequisite. The suicidal personality reflects impulsivity, rigidity, low self-esteem, dependency on the environment for stability, and a restricted problem-solving capacity.1 The choice of suicide implies a logic system that is tragically unique; life becomes more difficult than death.

Keywords

Suicide Attempt Suicide Rate Suicidal Risk Barbituric Acid Violent Death 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Melessa Phillips

There are no affiliations available

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