Radiologic Imaging in the Critically Ill Patient

  • Phillip M. Boiselle

Abstract

Radiology plays an important role in the care of the critically ill patient. The most commonly ordered imaging procedure is the portable chest radiograph, which is obtained on a daily basis for many critically ill patients. Other imaging procedures such as abdominal radiographs, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, ventilation—perfusion (VQ) imaging, and angiography are selectively ordered for specific indications. In this chapter, we review the fundamentals of radiologic imaging of the critically ill patient.

Keywords

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Acute Pulmonary Embolus Subcutaneous Emphysema Thoracic Compute Tomography Pulmonary Interstitial Emphysema 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip M. Boiselle

There are no affiliations available

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