Automated Model Synthesis

  • François E. Cellier

Abstract

In Chapters 12 to 14 of this text, we tried to imitate (model) the human ability to reason about system structure and system behavior. Now we shall let go of this constraint and discuss whether we can duplicate this capability in an analogical rather than a homomorphic fashion, i.e., we shall try to simulate human reasoning capabilities without restricting ourselves to methods that humans would or could use in their reasoning processes.

Keywords

Specialization Node Hierarchy Level Automate Model Martian Atmosphere Dynamic Rule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • François E. Cellier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Applied Mathematics ProgramUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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