Wireless Receivers: Architectures and Image Rejection

  • Kong-Pang Pun
  • José Epifânio da Franca
  • Carlos Azeredo-Leme
Chapter
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 728)

Abstract

As early as Armstrong invented the heterodyne receiver architecture eight decades ago [1], the image rejection had emerged as an important issue in the design of a radio receiver. The image problem arises from the fact that radio interferer at the image frequency will be downconverted to the same intermediate frequency (IF) as the desired signal and therefore corrupt it. The traditional method for rejecting the image interferer is to use a high quality factor (Q-factor) band-pass filter before the RF mixer. At that time all the electrical components were discrete, so was the image-reject filter. Currently, a majority of those discrete components can be put together to a small integrated circuit die, but hardly the image-reject filters. For high level receiver integration, this approach is not favoured.

Keywords

Intermediate Frequency Wireless Receiver Software Radio Image Interferer Image Rejection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kong-Pang Pun
    • 1
  • José Epifânio da Franca
    • 2
  • Carlos Azeredo-Leme
    • 3
  1. 1.The Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  2. 2.Chipldea Microelectronics S.A.Portugal
  3. 3.Instituto Superior TécnicoLisbonPortugal

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