Handling of Missing Data

  • Michel Chavance

Abstract

A number of the chapters in this volume deal with incomplete observations, offering a broad view of the issues surrounding missing data and of the main strategies proposed to deal with them. I provide some brief comments on these chapters.

Keywords

Life Study Observation Process Incomplete Observation Miss Data Mechanism Pragmatic Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel Chavance
    • 1
  1. 1.INSERMUSA

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