Programming and Execution

  • George S. Fishman
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Operations Research book series (ORFE)

Abstract

Converting modeling logic as in Chapter 2 into executable code is the next step in simulation program development. To this logic must be added all the housekeeping functions of assigning values to input parameters and arranging for the desired output to emerge at the end of program execution. This chapter illustrates these steps, first using the SIMSCRIPT II.5 simulation programming language and then the Arena general-purpose simulation system based on the SIMAN simulation language. It also describes how the resulting programs are executed and displays their output.

Keywords

Service Time Queue Length Pseudorandom Number Interarrival Time Automate Guide Vehicle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • George S. Fishman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Operations ResearchUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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