Efficient Gene Transfer to Neural Stem Cells by High Titer Retroviral Vectors

  • Hiroko Baba
  • Hideki Hida
  • Yuji Kodama
  • Cha-Gyun Jung
  • Chun-Zhen Wu
  • Kouji Nanmoku
  • Kazuhiro Ikenaka
  • Hitoo Nishino
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 53)

Abstract

Neural stem cells are self-renewing and multipotent cells, and are thought to be ideal sources for neural transplantation.1 However, controlled conversion of these cells into certain types of neurons is difficult. To establish a system for cell fate control or to employ gene manipulation to assign specific functions, the efficiency of retroviral gene transfer was examined. Retroviral transduction offers the advantage of stable gene expression as well as low cytotoxicity. Yet, the vector is limited by the low efficiency of infection. In this study, high titer retrovirus (up to 1012 cfu/ml) was prepared and neural stem cells were transduced efficiently. To test the application of this system in the therapy of Parkinson disease, virus producer cells containing the human tyrosine hydroxylase (HTH) gene were established to prepare high titer TH retrovirus.

Keywords

Neural Stem Cell Stable Gene Expression Packaging Cell Line Adenoviral Transduction Viral Producer Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroko Baba
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Hideki Hida
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yuji Kodama
    • 1
    • 2
  • Cha-Gyun Jung
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chun-Zhen Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kouji Nanmoku
    • 6
  • Kazuhiro Ikenaka
    • 3
    • 4
  • Hitoo Nishino
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyNagoya City University Medical SchoolNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Strategic Promotion System for Brain Research (SPSBS)Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and TechnologyJapan
  3. 3.Research for the FutureJapan Society for the Promotion ScienceJapan
  4. 4.National Institute for Physiological SciencesOkazakiJapan
  5. 5.Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life ScienceHachiojiJapan
  6. 6.School of MedicineHirosaki UniversityHirosakiJapan

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