Solid-Solid-Fluid Systems

  • Massoud Kaviany
Part of the Mechanical Engineering Series book series (MES)

Abstract

In this chapter the heat transfer in solid-solid-fluid systems with thermal nonequilibrium between the phase pairs will be examined. In the simplest of these systems, one of the solid phases has a simple geometry and bounds (in part) the other solid phase and the fluid phase. The second solid phase can be dispersed (as elements) into the fluid, and when there is no phase change this will be the particles-fluid flow around solid surfaces. These particles-fluid flows are divided into two classes. One is the particulate flows, where the fluid velocity is high enough such that there is a net (in the cross-section of the tube or channel) flow of particles. The second class is the fluidized beds, where the fluid velocity is low enough such that ideally there is no net (in the cross-section of the bed) flow of particles (i.e., particles recirculate in the bed). Chart 7.1 is based on this classification and gives further divisions in each class of the particles-fluid flow systems. Figures 7.1(a) and (b) render these two systems and shows that in practice there are also surfaces submerged in these flows. Figure 7.1(a) is for an internal particulate flow and heat transfer, where the net flow of particles and fluid is upward against the gravity vector.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Nusselt Number Heat Transfer Rate Heat Mass Transfer Particulate Flow 
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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massoud Kaviany
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied MechanicsUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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