Force Health Protection Through Global Medical Surveillance

  • Klaus Schafer
  • Edward Kline
  • Robert L. Williams
  • Robert Hardie
  • David Parker
  • James Mendes
  • Todd A. Ritter
  • David Beaulieu
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

The Desert Storm conflict of 1991 and 1992 was a strategic military victory for the United States, but in its wake came reports of medical ailments that became known as “Gulf War Syndrome” or “Persian Gulf Illness.” Like the post-Vietnam era, when many veterans complained that exposure to Agent Orange left them debilitated, Desert Storm raised critical issues for the Military Health System (MHS) and the United States Military. Thousands of American service personnel reported ailments following the conflict, and headlines told of birth defects found in Gulf War babies. Multiple theories were advanced, including oil-fume inhalation, exposure to chemical weapons, and delayed reactions to vaccines, but the cause proved elusive.

Keywords

Critical Success Factor Healthcare Information Entire Theater Enabling Technology Military Health System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. Gates, B. 1999. Business & the Speed of Thought: Using a Digital Nervous System. New York: Warner Books.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus Schafer
  • Edward Kline
  • Robert L. Williams
  • Robert Hardie
  • David Parker
  • James Mendes
  • Todd A. Ritter
  • David Beaulieu

There are no affiliations available

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