Ending the Forced Genital Cutting of Children and the Violation of their Human Rights

Ethical, Psychological and Legal Considerations
  • Gregory J. Boyle
Chapter

Abstract

Neonatal male circumcision has no medical indication,1 is non-therapeutic,2 and violates the child’s right to bodily integrity.3 No national or international medical association recommends routine neonatal male circumcision. Female circumcision has been outlawed in several jurisdictions where male circumcision persists. Failure to provide equal protection under the law for male minors is discriminatory. Parents cannot give legal consent for a nontherapeutic surgical intervention performed on an non-consenting minor.4 All forms of genital cutting imposed on children (including unnecessary sexreduction circumcision surgery, as well as sex-assignment/reassignment surgery) may have serious lifelong adverse physical, sexual, and psychological consequences.5 Genital cutting imposed on normal, healthy children causes grievous bodily harm (genital mutilation) and, in the absence of medical necessity, amounts to criminal sexual assault.6

Keywords

Male Circumcision Female Genital Mutilation Female Circumcision Infant Male Circumcision Grievous Bodily Harm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory J. Boyle
    • 1
  1. 1.Professor of PsychologyBond UniversityGold CoastAustralia

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