Training in Canada

  • Morley Gunderson
  • W. Craig Riddell
Chapter

Abstract

Training issues are at the forefront of concern for all major actors in the labor market in both developed and developing countries. For employers training is crucial to productivity and competitiveness. For employees it is a key ingredient of human capital formation to enhance wages and employability. For governments it is an important policy instrument to deal with adjustment consequences, productivity, growth,1 unemployment, and other broader social issues including those pertaining to income maintenance as well as special equity assistance for particular groups. Training is of particular policy and practical relevance since it is subject to policy control with respect to various dimensions: how much training; what type of training; where it should occur; and who should pay for it. In Canada, the continued importance of training is highlighted by the fact that it has been examined in a wide range of reports and Task Forces.2

Keywords

Labor Market Unemployment Insurance Labor Market Policy Employment Program Human Capital Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morley Gunderson
  • W. Craig Riddell

There are no affiliations available

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