X-Rays

  • C. H. Holbrow
  • J. N. Lloyd
  • J. C. Amato

Abstract

As the nineteenth century came to a close, three discoveries revolutionized physics, set the stage for remarkable technological developments, and ushered in a new century and a new physics. In 1895 Roentgen discovered x-rays; in 1896 Becquerel discovered radioactivity; in 1897 J. J. Thomson discovered the electron. Each discovery became a new tool with which physicists explored the atom and made the discoveries that have led to the extraordinary technology that underpins our society today.

Keywords

Compton Scattering Calcite Crystal American Physical Society Compton Effect Crystal Spectrometer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    W Friedrich, P. Knipping, and M. von Laue, “Interference phenomena with Röntgen rays,” Sitzungs-berichte d. Bayer. Akademie der Wissenschaften, 303–322 (1912); an abridged translation is given in The World of the Atom, edited by Henry Boorse and Lloyd Motz, Basic Books Publishers, New York, 1966, pp. 832–838.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W.H. Bragg and W.L. Bragg, “Reflection of x-rays by crystals,” Proc. Roy Soc. (London), Series A, 88 (1913), 428–438; reprinted in part in The World of the Atom, pp.845–852. See also X-Rays and Crystal Structure, W.H. Bragg and W.L. Bragg, G. Bell and Sons, Led., London, 1915.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    C.T. Ulrey, “Energy in the continuous x-ray spectra of certain elements,” Phys. Rev. 11, 401–410 (1918).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. H. Holbrow
    • 1
  • J. N. Lloyd
    • 1
  • J. C. Amato
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physics and AstronomyColgate UniversityHamiltonUSA

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