The Granularity of Light

  • C. H. Holbrow
  • J. N. Lloyd
  • J. C. Amato

Abstract

The discovery of the electron swiftly led to better understanding of the nature of matter. This in turn led to a revolution in the understanding of the nature of light. The most surprising outcome was the discovery that under many circumstances light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation behave like particles instead of waves. There are two outstanding examples of light behaving like particles. One example is called “the photoelectric effect” and the other “the Compton effect.”

Keywords

Work Function Maximum Energy Photomultiplier Tube Incident Particle Electron Multiplication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    Heinrich Hertz, Electric Waves, MacMillan & Co., London and New York, 1893.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. Hallwachs, Ann. d. Phys. 33, 301 (1888).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    R.A. Millikan, A direct photoelectric determination of Planck’s “b,” Phys. Rev. 7, 355–388(1916)Google Scholar
  4. R.A. Millikan, Einstein’s photoelectric equation and contact electromotive force, Phys. Rev. 7 (Second series), 18–32 (1916).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. H. Holbrow
    • 1
  • J. N. Lloyd
    • 1
  • J. C. Amato
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physics and AstronomyColgate UniversityHamiltonUSA

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