Knowledge Network Equilibrium

  • Anna Nagurney
Part of the Advances in Computational Economics book series (AICE, volume 10)

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss a new and evolving application of network equilibrium — that of knowledge networks. In today’s networked economy, the existence of highly skilled workers is essential for innovation, for research and development purposes, as well as, for increasing the competitive position of regions and nations.

Keywords

Utility Function Variational Inequality Wage Rate Variational Inequality Problem Knowledge Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Nagurney
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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