Sociocultural Issues in Health Care

  • Enrique S. Fernandez
  • Jeannette E. South-Paul
  • Samuel C. Matheny

Abstract

The world is facing movements of peoples unparalleled in history. Even the heartland of the American continent, which has seen few new population groups since the European immigration of the nineteenth century, has felt the effects of this restive population shift during the late 1980s and 1990s. Physicians who themselves have had little experience outside their own cultural environment are now dealing with health and social issues of patients who approach their surroundings in profoundly different ways than they might themselves. Yet the differences have always been present.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prenatal Care Family Leader African American Infant Competent Health Care 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Enrique S. Fernandez
  • Jeannette E. South-Paul
  • Samuel C. Matheny

There are no affiliations available

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