Behavioral Pharmacology of Caffeine

  • Suzette M. Evans
Chapter

Abstract

Caffeine, a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant, is the most widely used psychotropic drug in the world (Gilbert, 1984). In the United States, more than 85% of adults consume caffeine daily (Gilbert, 1976; Graham, 1978) and the average daily consumption is estimated to be 200 mg (Barone & Roberts, 1984). Caffeine is found in a wide variety of beverages (e.g., coffee, tea, colas), prescription drugs and over-the-counter stimulants, analgesics and cold preparations, and food items such as chocolate. Caffeine has been considered to be a model drug for studying and understanding drugs of abuse (Holtzman, 1990; Rush, Sullivan, & Griffiths, 1995), in part due to caffeine’s widespread use, and because caffeine produces a range of behavioral effects that are common to classic drugs of abuse.

Keywords

Locomotor Activity Discriminative Stimulus Subjective Effect Discriminative Stimulus Effect Caffeine Consumption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzette M. Evans
    • 1
  1. 1.The New York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA

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