Alkaloids pp 87-107 | Cite as

Chemical Taxonomy of Alkaloids

  • Peter G. Waterman

Abstract

The use of secondary metabolites produced by organisms as systematic markers is as old as the use of morphological characters but has, until this century, been subjective. For example, calling a plant aromatic was invariably an indication of the presence of volatile oils, whereas the sensation of “bitterness,” more often than not, denoted the presence of alkaloids.

Keywords

Schiff Base Anthranilic Acid Indole Alkaloid Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Tropane Alkaloid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter G. Waterman
    • 1
  1. 1.Phytochemistry Research LaboratoriesUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowScotland

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