Methods and Models for the Assessment of Third Party Risk Due to Aircraft Accidents in the Vicinity of Airports and Their Implications for Societal Risk

  • Michel Piers
Chapter
Part of the Technology, Risk, and Society book series (RISKGOSO, volume 12)

Abstract

Airports are hubs in the airtransportation system. Consequently, their presence causes a convergence of airtraffic over the area surrounding the airport. For the population living in the vicinity of an airport this implies involuntary exposure to the risk of aircraft accidents. Although the public is generally aware of the fact that flying is a very safe mode of transportation and hence the probability of an accident is very small, the frequent noise associated with aircraft passing overhead nevertheless acts as a strong reminder that sooner or later one may come down. While this may seem irrational, aircraft accidents involving considerable numbers of third party victims do occur several times a year. Probably the best known example is the tragic accident of a Boeing 747 in suburban Amsterdam in 1992. This and other serious accidents as well as a general public reluctance to tolerate additional negative effects of increasing economical activity have heightened public awareness of the issue and have led to considerable progress in methods and models for the calculation of third party risk around airports.

Keywords

Consequence Area Pool Fire Accident Rate Accident Data Accident Consequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

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  • Michel Piers

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