Radiation Hybrid Mapping

  • Kenneth Lange
Part of the Statistics for Biology and Health book series (SBH)

Abstract

In the 1970s Goss and Harris [12] developed a new method for mapping human chromosomes. This method was based on irradiating human cells, rescuing some of the irradiated cells by hybridization to rodent cells, and analyzing the hybrid cells for surviving fragments of a particular human chromosome. For various technical reasons, radiation hybrid mapping languished for nearly a decade and a half until revived by Cox et al. [10]. The current, more sophisticated and successful versions raise many fascinating statistical problems. We will first discuss the mathematically simpler case of haploid radiation hybrids. Once this case is thoroughly digested, we will turn to the mathematically subtler case of polyploid radiation hybrids.

Keywords

Hybrid Cell Radiation Hybrid Genetic Analysis Workshop Radiation Hybrid Mapping Posterior Mode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth Lange
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biostatistics and MathematicsUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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